Categories
Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors – Trelissick

The best way to approach this stately home is to cross the Carrick Roads (the River Fal) on the King Harry Ferry. It is a beautiful house, first built in 1824, with many later additions. The local village is called Feock and it is just a few miles outside of Truro, in Cornwall.

IMG_4141

IMG_4159

img_20180720_132616

Ida Copeland, politician, activist, philanthropist and enthusiastic promoter of the Girl Guide movement, handed over the house to the National Trust on the death of her son. Externally, the house is splendid, with cream ionic columns and large windows looking south past Falmouth and St Mawes to the English Channel. Internally, it is more like a family home, albeit a rather posh one. There is a collection of typewriters, some Spode China and lots of basic family portraits.

One of the ancestors, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, “discovered” Newfoundland, but his ship, the Squirrel, was lost with all hands in 1583. The Gothic water tower has a golden squirrel as a weathervane.
img_20180724_062115_666

The gardens are superb, with many hydrangeas in full bloom at this time of year. The rhododendrons are best seen in the spring when they are glorious. Look at my instagram feed to the right and see some of my flower photographs.

By Dr Alfred Prunesquallor

Maverick doctor with 40 years experience, I reduced my NHS commitment in 2013. I am now enjoying being free lance, working where I am needed overseas. Now I am working in the UK helping with the current coronavirus pandemic.

5 replies on “Thursday Doors – Trelissick”

These doors are quite different from the ones in your posts about Africa. These more familiar styles are lovely, while the African doors are often gasp-producing. 🙂 Thank you for sharing both.

As a note, Humphrey Gilbert did play a large part in Newfoundland’s history, but the province was actually discovered in 1497 by Venetian explorer John Cabot.

Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s