First day at the Clinic

Kakumbi Rural Health Centre

Baboons. Need I say more? At least a hundred of the little blighters, making mischief. But animals have priority on the roads, so I waited until they had crossed.

The road was badly cut up by trucks driving through the muddy sand. There were lots of pools on the track, but the deepest had been partially filled in with old bricks to provide a better grip for the tyres. The big dirt road had several streams running across it, creating gorges which needed careful negotiation. As I reached the tarmac road, a lorry came into view. The passengers in the back were waving frantically at me. I didn’t realise I was so popular, I thought, until I turned the corner and saw a large bull elephant ripping tasty branches from a roadside tree. So they were trying to warn me.

Good morning and welcome to South Luangwa!

Normally when you see one elephant, you can be sure that there are others nearby. But lone bulls do venture off on their own, so I wasn’t too alarmed. I drove slowly towards him but couldn’t resist a few photographs. Just to prove the veracity of the story, of course.

Further along the road, I saw bushbuck and puku antelopes, as well as another mob of baboons. The village hasn’t changed much. A few new shops here and there, more potholes in the road to the bridge and a new restaurant, which I will have to visit soon.

More churches have been built beside the back road to the clinic. The Obama Bar has closed during the day and its courtyard is a haven for grazing goats. But at night it remains highly active. The clinic road is worse and I passed the rear of a sign saying, “Road Closed Turn Right.” The clinic has a new HIV/AIDS block in shimmering white, built by US aid (PEPFAR). The clinic now deals with 875 patients living with HIV without the fortnightly visits from the district hospital.

New block built with US Aid money for HIV/AIDS support
Maternity Block, now usable as it has an electricity supply
First delivery of my tenure – I had nothing to do with this!
Incinerator and drug pit

The maternity block has finally got an electrical connection so it can function as intended. The consultation rooms look cleaner, water flows from the taps and there is soap. The only towel is the one I donated in 2014, which looked rather grubby. I wiped my hands on the seat of my trousers.

Erina starts the fire with plastic and wood to heat the steriliser

The staff who knew me were delighted to see me again. The new health workers welcomed me back and we chatted about the good old days. “But the drug situation is worse now. We have less medication now than we had when you were last here, doc.”

The clinic water supply tower
The patients’ toilets, with the incinerator in the background

People in the Ministry of Health must be worried about the increase in malaria cases in this district. We are adopting a proactive strategy of testing and treating anyone who lives near all new patients found to be suffering from malaria. Unfortunately, heavy rain has made it almost impossible to get to remote areas to carry this out. It will be an interesting experiment.

The clinic now runs two community clinics a week, in which I will participate, as well as a schools inspection and health education
programmes (sexual health is on the agenda again).

It feels great to be back.

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Published by Dr Alfred Prunesquallor

Maverick doctor with 40 years experience, resigned from the UK NHS in 2013. I am now enjoying being free lance, working where I am needed overseas.

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