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Life Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors FA Cup

On Saturday 15th May 2021, Leicester City Football Club won the Football Association Cup for the first time since the club was founded in 1884. The club is older than Arsenal and Chelsea (whom Leicester beat in the final 1-0).

Leicester City is a relatively small football club, whose stadium only seats 32,312 fans. The club has a reputation for being the underdog and has tremendous support from the citizens of Leicester – see this small selection of doors with posters and LCFC flags.

There is even a Leicester City FC flag over the doorway to the cathedral (and there is also a hidden reference to LCFC winning the premiership title five years ago in one of its modern stained glass windows).

The top four clubs in the premier league go through to the European Championship competition. Sadly, Leicester dropped to fifth place on the final day of the season, and missed the cut. This was the first time LCFC dropped out of the top four during the entire 2020/21 season.

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Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors Narrow

Narrow boats. On the Grand Union Canal just south of Leicester, by Kilby Bridge. The doors are not the most noticeable features of the canal boats.

Not sure if they will be using the ball and chain attached to the prow
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Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors Corners

I was not aware that there are some TD contributors who are especially enamoured with corner doors. I have a couple here from Leicester’s Clarendon Park .

“Love Me Do” by the Beatles, but this also refers to “Love My (Hair)Do”

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Life Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors JWH

John Woolman was a famous Quaker in the 18th Century. He lived in New Jersey and was a strong abolitionist. In 1772 Woolman sailed to Britain to speak out against slavery. Instead of taking a passenger’s cabin, he showed his egalitarian spirit by lodging with the crew. When he arrived in London, the Quakers were rather taken aback by his shabby clothing, but when he spoke condemning the injustice of slavery, he was accepted.

To spread the word, he set off to travel north to York but declined to travel by stagecoach because he felt it was cruel to drive the horses so hard. Instead, he walked, preaching against slavery en route. Sadly, he picked up smallpox along the way and died just after reaching York. He is commemorated by the establishment of John Woolman House. This is a Quaker residential home for older people, close to New Walk. The doors facing New Walk are painted in bright colours.

This door without a handle is not part of John Woolman House
And neither is this distressed door. It is on Princess Street Backways.