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Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors Angel 2

More lovely doors from this trendy quartier of London.

The ridges on the door are mirrored by the bars on the window. A pleasant park is just around the corner.
Blue doors under a plaster canopy.
Shades of Rene Magritte – “This is not number 22A” (ceci n’est pas … The Treachery of Images)
Faded glory. Tender loving care and restoration needed here.
There we go, look how good the previous door could look
This is a bank. If cell phones fail, there are always carrier pigeons on hand.
Mexican restaurant
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Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors Double

I am still showing photographs of doors in the Angel, Islington. These are all double.

Dusky pink and navy blue
Pretty fanlight above 21
Dove grey and sage green
Where are the handles?
Double gates, rather than doors.
Unity and Tango Lessons
Rather handsome double doors with a rounded bay window between them
Categories
Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors Angel

On the corner of Pentonville Road and Islington High Street there has been a building called the Angel for over four centuries. The present building has been restored and stands above the Angel Underground Station. I went walkabout in the area last Sunday and took pictures of some interesting doors.

This rather blurry photo of a door was taken from a distance with a smart phone. I particularly like the fanlight.

The main street, running north – south, was the route taken by herdsmen driving their livestock from farms north of London to the huge meat market at Smithfield. In the 17th century, 30,000 beasts a week made their last journey past these doors.

This fine portico protects a door with etched glass designs. I think that the holes at the base of the pillars contained a metal bar which you used to scrape the mud off your boots.
Upper House (House of Wolf) has some interesting woodwork on the fanlight above the door on the extreme right hand side of the picture, by the lady with the yellow skirt
Islington Town Hall, in all its glory
On Cross Street, this is Perkins & Co Ltd. Although the actual door is nothing to write home about, the glazed brown and orange tiles are splendid. Look above the door to see the frieze between the windows.
This house is on five floors. I like the creeper which covers the walls. The blue door is plain, but the pink door of the neighbouring house is interesting, with the black portico.
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Life Thursday Doors Zambia

Thursday Doors Appeal

If you have been following my contributions to Thursday Doors over the years, you will know that I do voluntary work as a doctor overseas. Last year I was working at Kakumbi Rural Health Centre in Eastern Province, Zambia. It was distressing to see the lack of medical care for people with severe mental illness, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Their families would look after them as best they could; but if the patients became violent or started destroying property, this support could end. Patients would roam around the village, clearly very disturbed, behaving inappropriately (throwing stones at vehicles, wandering about naked).

Thursday’s door – torn off its hinges during a violent outburst by the man wearing white trousers. He has a long history of bipolar disorder. Neighbours managed to subdue him and chained him to the door to prevent him from doing more damage to people and property. They felt there was nothing else they could do. However, with mood stabilising medication, he is now able to lead a normal life.

Unfortunately, the Zambian Health Service has been unable to provide medication to treat this group of patients. I started treating them using very basic psychiatric medication which I bought from a local pharmacy (with some financial help). These patients need long term medication and if the supply were to stop, they are likely to relapse and become very unwell. So last year I asked my friends on Facebook if they would like to contribute and I raised over £1000. All this money has now been used up, purchasing medication locally for over 20 patients.

Drs Keith and Ginny Birrell (from North East England) are currently volunteering in Kakumbi. They have expanded the pool of patients to include people suffering from epilepsy and children with learning disabilities. Some of their anecdotes follow:

They have treated a 14 year old boy suffering from epilepsy which was so disabling that it prevented him from attending school. With medication, he is now almost seizure-free and is keen to start school (although he will be twice the age of his classmates in Year 1).

With anti-psychotic medication, a 49 year old woman, who suffers from chronic schizophrenia, is no longer having hallucinations or having violent outbursts.

Walking and bicycling are the main ways people get about in rural Zambia. Cycling can be very dangerous for people living with epilepsy, but with regular medication seizures can be well controlled (if the patient feels an epileptic attack coming on, they have been trained how to stop, dismount and lie in a safe place). Being able to ride a bike because their epilepsy is well controlled might seem trivial, but to this group of patients it is a major improvement in their quality of life.

When patients are stable, Dr Keith is trying to reduce the dose of anti-psychotic medication – to reduce side effects, not to save money!

I am hoping to raise £2,500 to buy medication for this group of vulnerable and disadvantaged patients. (I have donated £100 instead of sending Christmas cards this year.)

Every donation will make a difference: you can donate via PayPal

Kakumbi Rural Health Centre, Eastern Province, Zambia