Categories
Life Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in Butrint, Albania

In the southernmost part of Albania, across the Ionian Sea from Corfu, is the ancient city of Butrint. The historic ruins date back over 3,000 years. Not surprisingly, it is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Romans took over from the Greeks in about 200 BC, and in 48 BC, Julius Caesar gave it to his troops who had defeated the army of his rival, Pompey. It has an amphitheatre, an aqueduct, a forum and baths.

The Venetians occupied the city and built a fort to protect it (unsuccessfully) from the Ottomans in the early 18th century. By WW1, it was deserted and ruined, but an Italian archeologist Luigi Ugolini started excavations in the 1920s during Italian rule.

This is the Venetian tower guarding Butrint. It has a drawbridge.
It is rather rickety, but illustrates how difficult it would have been to defeat the defenders
There is a modern castle built on the highest point of the Butrint peninsula. The door was locked. But underneath, there is a fascinating museum with some of the treasures of Butrint displayed.
Sturdy walls have been repointed. The door needs some attention, too.
Roman Amphitheatre
Butrint Peninsula, with the double headed black eagle flag of Albania